How International Offerings Can Enhance Your Curriculum

Dr. Wally Sanders President Vanguard Global Institute Globalization is one of the most important factors in today’s business environment. The success of Japan, the Asian Dragons (Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan) have been past reminders of a progressive global economy.  However, we now face an even greater challenge from Asia – China. The increasing competitiveness of the global environment has been well established and business educators have begun to focus on the need to internationalize the curricula. Many universities are currently adopting a global mind-set for the good of the institution and students. 

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Be Cautious With Regard to “No Closing Costs”

Michael Tapscott Director of the Multicultural Student Center George Washington University It is no secret that as higher education costs go up, inevitably, many students will be more dependent on financial aid. Recent federal legislation ensures that eligibility for a higher loan amounts will grow while federal grant programs remain stagnant. Loan maximums for freshmen and sophomore students will increase but there will be no corresponding increase in federal grants.

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Expanded Chief Academic Officer Roles Require New Models

Dr. Marylouise Fennell Senior Counsel Council of Independent Colleges Dr. Scott D. Miller President Wesley College Higher education has become progressively more competitive, forcing ever more institutions to adopt and apply best business practices to thrive. For presidents, the “business” of higher education consumes increasing amounts of time. Regardless of the size or location of an institution, most college presidents today tell us that they are spending at least 60 percent of their time off-campus dealing with external stakeholders including friend raisers, fundraisers, and chief financial and marketing officers. This new “business” model means that college presidents are functioning mainly […]

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Where Should We Be Now?

John W. Dysart President The Dysart Group, Inc. The beginning of April is upon us and there are a few benchmarks that can be reviewed by top administrators at private colleges and universities. The following do not apply to institutions that can consistently rely on the national reply date to secure their class of new students.  At least 70 percent of applications for admission should either be accepted or rejected at this point. Percentages lower than the recommended amount might be a sigh of poor admission counselor follow-up with admission applicants. Low folder completion rates can also be a sign […]

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Proper Database Management Can Improve Yields

April Clark CAS It is very easy to overlook your in-house database when planning your annual budget. There are several processes that are imperative for successful communication. If the post office cannot find your students, then you cannot communicate with them.  Data hygiene is not an unmanageable mystery, you simply need to have a specific plan and choose a trusted partner to handle the process. Data hygiene can be cost-effective. In fact , it is less expensive to keep your lists clean, than pay the cost for wasted postage and wasted print materials sent to inaccurate addresses. 

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A Few Things to Consider About New Financial Aid Regulations

John W. Dysart President The Dysart Group, Inc. While nothing is ever certain, it does seem we have some new things to consider about laws and regulations related to financial aid.  Federal Stafford Loan limits are going to be increased for undergraduate student beginning in 2007. Consider that these changes in eligibility could be positive for institutions, especially private institutions. Federal Stafford Loan eligibility will increase for freshmen from $2625 per year to $3500. Eligibility for sophomores will increase from $3500 to $4500. Increased borrowing eligibility levels will provide the opportunity for students to cover a greater portion of their […]

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House Defeats HHS-Spending Bill; University Still Receives Funding

Louis Dupart Partner Fleishman and Walsh, LLP “In a stunning setback for House GOP leaders, a $142.5 billion FY06 Labor-HHS appropriations bill went down to a 224-209 defeat this afternoon,” reported the National Journal in the November 17, 2005 issue of Congress Daily.  The Labor-HHS Bill is the principal bill by which colleges and universities receive Congressional “earmarks.” Congress’ failure to complete this bill means many schools counting on substantial new money from Washington will be sorely disappointed this year because they failed to diversify their requests and take cues from the legislative process.  The disappointment felt by many schools […]

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Leveraging and Predictive Modeling in Financial Aid

Dr. Scott D. Miller President Wesley College Leveraging formulas and predictive modeling programs have become popular in recent years. Using historic trends, tracking individual characteristics of aid recipients and calculating conversions and yields can be useful. College and university administrators should be cautious, however, when purchasing such services. Financial aid is certainly an important influence in the college selection process. It would be a mistake to overestimate the impact of the amount of aid or aid structure in decision- making. So many other factors can influence college choice. Location, academic reputation, facilities, co curricular opportunities, academic support services and even […]

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Advertising Versus Direct Marketing for Recruitment

Douglas E. Clark Vice President of Enrollment Management Ferrum College Enrollment managers are, with the possible exception of those with unlimited budgets, confronted with the need to make choices about how their marketing dollars are spent. When resources are scarce, it is important to maximize the results from every marketing dollar.  One ongoing issue is how to divide the dollars between advertising activities and direct marketing activities. This article will argue the dollars spent on direct marketing have more impact than advertising dollars. So the next time you are pressed by admissions “experts” who want you to spend your scarce […]

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Anatomy of a Significant Tuition Increase

John W. Dysart President The Dysart Group, Inc. Colleges and universities generally raise the price of tuition every year. While there are the rare exceptions, most institutions raise prices to deal with planned improvements, annual increases levied on their own budgets by various vendors and the need to address salary adjustments and increases in benefit costs.  Sometimes, leaders need to consider approaches to pricing that are more aggressive than typical. I worked with one Southern college that made the difficult decision to implement a significant increase in tuition in 2005. The college leadership had held tuition increases to modest levels […]

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