Considerations in Evaluating Your Institutional Discount Rate

Douglas E. Clark Vice President of Enrollment Management Ferrum College John W. Dysart President The Dysart Group, Inc. Discount rates are always an important topic for evaluation and discussion at private colleges and universities. The institutional discount rate is simply the amount of unfunded institutional aid as a percentage of gross tuition revenue. For example, if a college is spending $4,500,000 in institutional financial aid against a gross tuition figure of $10,000,000 then the discount rate is 45%. (Note: The traditional, generally accepted method for calculating the institutional discount rate includes only tuition revenue). Institutions constantly monitor their rates, seek […]

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Wesley College: An Extraordinary Turnaround

John W. Dysart President The Dysart Group, Inc. Although alumni today often boast about how Wesley, a predominately liberal arts college in Dover, Delaware, affiliated with the United Methodist Church “refused to die,” the fact is that the 133-year-old institution was almost moribund when President Scott D. Miller assumed the presidency in 1997. As strategic enrollment management consultant to the College throughout the last decade, it has been an inspiration to watch Wesley’s transformation since Dr. Miller’s infusion of business and marketing savvy, coupled with his infectious enthusiasm and high energy, propelled Wesley’s future to possibilities unimagined  10 years ago. […]

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The Democrats Take Control of Congress: Prepare for Changes

John W. Dysart President The Dysart Group, Inc. The Democrats have taken control of both houses of Congress and higher education changes are expected. While most of the prospective news looks promising for enrollment administrators, one change could turn into a financial burden. The good news is talk of increasing the maximum amount of the Federal Pell Grant for the first time in more than four years. The current maximum award is only $4,050 and some are advocating an increase perhaps as high as $5,100. Such an increase would certainly benefit needy undergraduates but would also assist colleges and universities […]

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